Komodo Liveaboard Trip: On Ethical Tourism

For those who grow up with cities, buildings, and heavily congested roads all on their life, the Komodo would look like some sort of magical place. All the charming, savannah-covered rolling hills on the barren islands. The dream-like Komodo liveaboard trip, passing emerald ocean and Jurassic-looking landscape. Visiting hidden beaches and having wild sunset. For many travelers, the Komodo is a rare haven to escape from worldly worries and being reconnected with nature. In fact, it’s still very much a sanctuary for the prehistoric, nearly extinct, wild Komodo Dragons.

How to Have Ethical Tourism on Komodo Liveaboard Trip

In regards to its conservation status, you can make your boat trip to Komodo more ethical and sustainable. Follow these simple rules. Lead by example and keep the earth being a kind place for every living creatures. 

Use Only Reef-Friendly Toiletries in Komodo Liveaboard 

By the time you book a Komodo liveaboard, you should know what goes in will go out to the sea. Especially water and liquids from the bathroom. That’s why every passengers are highly advised to use only reef friendly, all natural toiletries product. The Komodo is very famous for its rich and vibrant marine life. Let us keep it that way. 

Discourage People from Disturbing the Dragons

How to Have Ethical Tourism on Komodo Liveaboard Trip

Do you see those park rangers with wooden fork stick that supposed to protect you from the dragons? Yeah, some of them use it to poke the sleeping dragons just to make them walk. They think you will be more interested to see a moving dragons—to show their ferociousness. The dragons just love to nap during the hot day. Much like you! So let them sleep in peace. They are not here for your entertainment. Discourage this behaviour so the park could stay as an ethical and safe space for the wildlife. 

Keep Your Distance from Wild Animals in the Park

The Komodo Dragons are not the only resident inside the Komodo National Park. Here you’ll find water buffalos, boars, deers, birds, and other creatures—all wild. While people naturally keep their distance from the Komodo Dragons (no one wants to get the deadly bite), it’s harder to resist touching the smaller animals. The wild rusa deers and boars are quite docile too, so many tourists want to play around with them. But you shouldn’t. Unwanted human contact can cause them stress or losing too much energy from running away. They are being illegally poached and (legally) hunted by the dragons already, so give them some rest. 

Never Smoke in One of the Islands—or Inside Komodo Liveaboard

Do you know that the lands in Komodo are so dry even the smallest tinder can spark huge fires? never ever smoke within the national park. You don’t want to be the one causing Komodo’s mass extinction. Also, smoking in the Komodo liveaboard is just as dangerous—and if you able to smoke safely, the butts will be dumped to the ocean eventually. Basically, avoid smoking at all.

Always Bring Water Bottle from Komodo Liveaboard to Everywhere

How to Have Ethical Tourism on Komodo Liveaboard Trip

Some ethical Komodo liveaboard know how a single tumbler could save our ocean and they provide it during the trip. If your liveaboard does, then you’re lucky. You just need to remember to refill and take it wherever you go. But it they don’t, you need to bring your own bottles. Never purchase a bottled water unless in emergency. 

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Never Attempt to Throw Any Food to the Dragons

Do you know that the park’s canteen is one of Komodo’s favourite hangout? These seemingly brutal dragons actually love to relax under the shade of the canteens. The canteen are actually lifted, so they won’t able to climb it up anyway. However, some people seems to not having enough brain cells, as they attempt to throw foods at the dragon. Don’t. That would only lessen the wildness of the Komodo dragons—or evoking aggressive behaviour to visitors for food. 

Avoid Single Plastic Use at All Cost

Buying something from the local ‘warung’ food stall? Ask them for no plastic bags. Some Komodo liveaboard pack lunch for their passengers as well, so you might ask them beforehand to make sure the lunches are packed in paper instead of plastic.